Chalet

Chalet

The Chalets are situated on top of the picturesque sand dunes overlooking the Indian ocean, the chalets are perfect for the family getaway or a romantic weekend. Spectacular scenery from the deck of the Quobba coastline both north and south. A great place to sit and watch the whales swim by during the season. The Chalets are fully self contained (excluding bed linen) with their own kitchens, shower and toilet facilities. One room contains a queen size bed, the other contains two sets of single bunks, in total sleeping 6 people comfortably. The Chalets are equipped with 24 hour power.

Camping & Carvan

Camping & Carvan

There are multiple caravan and camping sites on Quobba. Powered sites are run off the station generator. Power times are approximately 6 – 8am, 12 – 2pm, 5.30 – 10.30pm. No electrical cooking appliances are allowed, fresh water is available and a common ablutions block is available. No booking / reservations required.

Shacks

Shacks

The Shack, the Brown and the Green shacks are transportables. They each sleep between 4 – 6 people. They have a self contained kitchen and dining area. These three cottages all use the common ablution block and run power off the station generator for 10 hours per day. The Shack and the Brown cottages have recently been renovated and are great for families or fishing.

Shearing Quarters

Shearing Quarters

The Shearers Quarters were still used every year for shearing on the Station until damara sheep replaced the merino flock.The Quarters sleep between 15 – 20 people, all single beds. It has a self contained kitchen and a very large dining/entertainment area (the greatest dining table for very long dinners). The Quarters use the common ablution block and the power runs off the station generator for 10 hours per day. The Quarters are only available for the larger groups and are ideal for schools or some corporate team building rugged outback coastal experience.

Cottages

Cottages

The 5 cottages were originally part of the station outbuildings when WA “rode on the sheep’s back”.